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Dean Willbanks working with a student.

Scholarship and Collaboration

Great minds don't always think alike—which is why it's so important to share ideas and seek solutions together. The faculty at Vermont Law School collaborate extensively with colleagues, students, outside experts, and each other to develop and communicate their ground-breaking research.

Our low student-faculty ratio and our innovative initiatives ensure high student participation in these efforts. Recent projects undertaken by our research institutes have focused on international human rights, biofuels, climate change, land use planning, affordable housing, flood plain issues, smart growth, environmental taxation, and wildlife protection, among other issues. Scholarship at VLS addresses local and regional concerns as well as pressing global problems that affect us all.

Many of these collaborations lead to conferences, workshops, and symposia—typically over 60 such events each year with a focus ranging from capital punishment to global environmental leadership. In addition, our faculty produce a wealth of scholarship on topics such as civil rights, healthcare, sustainability, comparative law, national security, domestic violence, capital punishment, taxation, energy efficiency, and other current issues.

 

Video of Professor Oliver Goodenough’s talk at Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet & Society on how to create an e-curriculum is now available.

Professor Jennifer Taub’s article, "Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Whale," was published in The Pareto Commons, March 16, 2013. It is available here.

Professor Taub participated on two panels, "Author Meets Reader—The Ponzi Scheme Puzzle: A History and Analysis of Con Artists and Victims," and "Toward Law and Political Economy: Transforming Unequal Power through Heterodox Theory," at the Law and Society Conference in Boston, June 1 - June 2, 2013. She spoke at the Chinese University of Hong Kong conference on "Finding the Right Balance of Regulation for Economic Development: China and Western Regulatory Models," May 24 - 25, 2013. She participated in a roundtable event, "Corporate Governance and Financial Risk: Is ESG Adequate?" sponsored by the Initiative for Responsible Investment at the Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations at the Harvard Kennedy School and the Elfenworks Center for the Study of Fiduciary Capitalism at Saint Mary’s College of California, on May 6, 2013 in Cambridge, MA. She spoke at the "Trans-Atlantic Agenda for Shared Prosperity” Conference sponsored by the AFL-CIO, Friedrich Ebert Stiftung, and Macroeconomic Policy Institute in Washington, D.C., on February 11, 2013.

Professor Craig Pease's latest articles published in the Environmental Forum:
Chesapeake Bay, RIP—or TMDL? (May/June 2013)
Enclosing the DNA Commons (March/April 2013)
Aliens Live in Our Brains!!! (January/February 2013)

Professor Brian Porto’s 2012 book, The Supreme Court and the NCAA: The Case for Less Commercialism and More Due Process in College Sports (Univ. of Michigan Press) was published in a paperback edition in the summer of 2013.

His article “Can the NCAA Enforcement Process Protect Children From Abuse in the Wake of the Sandusky Scandal?” was published in the Widener Law Journal in June 2013. This article grew out of a symposium in which he participated as a panelist at Widener Law School in Harrisburg, PA, in October 2012.

Professor Laurie Ristino is an editor and columnist for the American Bar Association’s Natural Resources & Environment Magazine. Here are some recent articles that have been published:
Columnist, Leading Edge Winter 2013, "Where Do the Children Play"
Columnist, Summer, 2013, "Lean In, Real-Time"
Summer, 2013, “In Support of Practical Scholarship” article
Fall 2013, Co-lead Editor of the Food Issue with Madeline June Kass, Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Professor John Echeverria's opinion piece, "A Legal Blow to Sustainable Development," on the recent Supreme Court decision on land use, was published in the New York Times.

Professor Pat Parenteau and Abigail Barnes ’14 have an article, “A Bridge Too Far: Building Off Ramps on the Shale Gas Superhighway,” published in the July 2013 issue of the Idaho Law Review.

Professor Pat Parenteau’s article, “Lessons the Darter Should Have Taught Us,” was published this summer in the Tennessee Law Review. His article “Wetlands Conservation and Climate Change,” was included in the National Wetlands Newsletter’s July/August edition. Professor Parenteau’s article, “Doing the Math: The Prescription for Climate Stability,” will be published in the Environmental Law Reporter in the fall of 2013.

Professor Janet E. Milne has had an article, "The US Supreme Court Opens a New Door-Expanded Opportunities for Environmental Taxation," published in the Environmental Law Reporter for May 2013.

Librarian Cynthia Lewis’s article, “Is Your Library in Good Standing?” was published in the American Association of Law Librarians (AALL) Spectrum magazine. The article spotlights the standing desks (“Stand-leys”) in the library that were a brainchild of Cynthia’s. She worked with Will Hastings in Buildings & Grounds to have the stand-ley’s built. We then held a competition to name desks and ultimately, the name “Stand-ley” won. The Stand-leys have been a huge success with our student users.