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Vermont Law School will continue with virtual classes during the fall semester. The physical campus will reopen as soon as it is safe to do so. VLS community members should download the Health Screening App and check their email for more information. Please visit vermontlaw.edu/covid19 for general information, resources, and updates.

2020 Fall Residential "Virtual" Classes

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Students, please note:  CampusWeb is the authoritative source for class information, so please refer to CampusWeb when making final registration ​​decisions.​​​​​

2020 Fall Residential "Virtual" Classes

CLI9318.01/ Environmental Justice Clinic

The Environmental Justice Clinic works on behalf of community-based organizations on administrative cases and projects: administrative complaints, petitions, and comments; litigation; and legislation. The docket includes cases under civil rights and environmental statutes, and supports community based movements challenging the impacts of industrial agriculture and other contamination on communities of color and low-income communities.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5238.01/ Global Sustainability Field Study

The Cuban Farm and Energy Tour.

Professor(s)

Kevin B. Jones

Semester

2020 Fall

INT7424.01/ International Human Rights

This seminar provides an introduction to international human rights law and procedures. It examines what are "human rights" and explores the law of treaty interpretation, how human rights law is incorporated into domestic legal systems, and the role of international governmental organizations, international and regional courts, and non-governmental organizations in protecting human rights. Students gain experience in researching international law and in international legal analysis.

Professor(s)

Molly Gray JD'14

Semester

2020 Fall

BUS6218.01/ Intro to Start Up Law

Through the use of innovation legal tools and processes, this course introduces the legal skills and knowledge needed to provide emerging triple bottom line start-ups, entrepreneurs and communities with legal guidance to promote environmental health and social change via community redevelopment, public benefit enterprise and social justice non-profits. Students will learn about innovative legal solutions and tools for offering affordable legal services, and deepen their understanding of how legal practice and business can catalyze environmental and social change.

Professor(s)

Jeannette Eicks

Semester

2020 Fall

CLI9435.01/ Judicial Externship PT

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

WRI7950.01/ Law Review I

AWR

F 2:10 PM-3:25 PM; On-campus

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

JUR7323.01/ The Law & Popular Culture

This class explores images of law and lawyers as depicted in popular culture, the influences of popular culture upon legal practice, and legal storytelling in popular culture and in law practice. The primary texts are popular movies about legal subjects and readings in a Law and Popular Culture textbook.

Professor(s)

Philip N. Meyer

Semester

2020 Fall

CLI9437.01/Adv Energy Clinic

Professor(s)

Kevin B. Jones
Jeannie Oliver

Semester

2020 Fall

CLI9348.01/Adv Env Justice Clinic

Students in the Advanced Environmental Justice Clinic will build on the knowledge and skills they developed in the EJ Clinic. Students will be exposed to new material and concepts as they work on administrative cases and projects, litigation, and legislation on behalf of environmentally overburdened communities of color and low-income communities.

Professor(s)

Marianne Engelman Lado

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV7380.01/Adv Environmental Legal Research

Provides in-depth exposure to the most useful, efficient strategies and resources for environmental law research, including highly specialized information databases, advanced administrative law research, legislative history, and environmental news/updating services.

Professor(s)

Christine Ryan

Semester

2020 Fall

CRI7305.01/Adv. Criminal Law Seminar

This seminar will focus on Alternative Criminal Justice Programs and Responses. Using a national template known as the Sequential Intercept Model, students will be introduced to evidence-based approaches and programs at every stage of the criminal justice system that provide effective alternatives to the traditional model from arrest through release from incarceration. Students will not only gain an in depth knowledge of regional, national and international alternative criminal justice approaches, they will also meet with and learn from leading alternative justice practitioners.

Professor(s)

Robert Sand

Semester

2020 Fall

RSJ7210.E1/Adversity Trauma Victimization

This course will explore the legal, historical, cultural, and psychological frameworks underlying victim rights law, as well as best practices for effective victim/survivor engagement across the American criminal justice system.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5401.01/Agricultural & the Environment

Land used for agricultural purposes (timer land excepted) accounts for nearly 53% of the total land area of the United States - the largest category of land use by far. This course addresses the complex and interconnected relationship of environmental and agricultural law, its historical roots and modern developments. Class meets for 3 weekends in September.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5205.01/Air Pollution Law and Policy

An exploration of the major programs and regulatory strategies embodied in the Clean Air Act that are used to address conventional air pollution, toxic air pollution, and greenhouse gas pollution.

Professor(s)

Jennifer K. Rushlow

Semester

2020 Fall

ADR6410.01/Alternative Dispute Resolution

This course presents the theory and practice of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration that constitute the foundation of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) through lecture and simulations. Examines the different theories and approaches to ADR, as well as the wide range of issues that arise in the selection and application of these dispute resolution techniques.

Professor(s)

Joan Vogel

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7255.01/Appellate Advocacy

An exercise in appellate brief writing and oral argument using a case pending before the United States Supreme Court. Classes focus on the appellate process, complex research and analysis, preparation of briefs, critical writing skills, and oral argument.

MW 9:55 AM-11:10 AM; On-campus, Debevoise Hall, MAP room

 

Professor(s)

Jared Carter

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7255.02/Appellate Advocacy

An exercise in appellate brief writing and oral argument using a case pending before the United States Supreme Court. Classes focus on the appellate process, complex research and analysis, preparation of briefs, critical writing skills, and oral argument.

MW 2:10 PM-3:35 PM; On-campus, Debevoise Hall, MAP room

 

Professor(s)

Jared Carter

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7255.03/Appellate Advocacy

An exercise in appellate brief writing and oral argument using a case pending before the United States Supreme Court. Classes focus on the appellate process, complex research and analysis, preparation of briefs, critical writing skills, and oral argument.

T, Th 9:55 AM-11:10 AM; On-campus, Debevoise Hall, MAP room

Professor(s)

Brian Porto

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7255.04/Appellate Advocacy

An exercise in appellate brief writing and oral argument using a case pending before the United States Supreme Court. Classes focus on the appellate process, complex research and analysis, preparation of briefs, critical writing skills, and oral argument.

T,Th 11:20 AM-12:35 PM; On-campus, Debevoise Hall, Nina Thomas

 

Professor(s)

Catherine Fregosi

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7255.05/Appellate Advocacy

An exercise in appellate brief writing and oral argument using a case pending before the United States Supreme Court. Classes focus on the appellate process, complex research and analysis, preparation of briefs, critical writing skills, and oral argument.

MW 11:20 AM-12:35 PM; On-campus, Debevoise Hall, Nina Thomas

Professor(s)

Catherine Fregosi

Semester

2020 Fall

WRI7352.01/Bar Exam Skills & Tactics

Skills-development course designed to provide students with the analytical, test-taking, writing, and study skills that are critical to students' success on the bar exam and in the practice of law. The course consists of an intensive substantive and analytical review of major multi-state bar exam subjects and of numerous writing and practice assignments.

MW 9:55 AM-11:10 AM; On-campus, Oakes Hall, Classroom 211

Professor(s)

Richard Sala JD/MELP'13

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7102.01/Civil Procedure I

Covers the procedural rules governing civil actions in the state and federal courts, from commencement through appeal, including jurisdiction over parties, joinder of parties and claims, contents of pleadings, pretrial motions and discovery, conduct of trial, post-trial motions, res judicata, collateral estoppel, and conflicts between the state and federal judicial systems.

Professor(s)

Beth McCormack

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7102.02/Civil Procedure I

Covers the procedural rules governing civil actions in the state and federal courts, from commencement through appeal, including jurisdiction over parties, joinder of parties and claims, contents of pleadings, pretrial motions and discovery, conduct of trial, post-trial motions, res judicata, collateral estoppel, and conflicts between the state and federal judicial systems.

Professor(s)

Pamela A. Vesilind

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5212.01/Climate Change and the Law

Climate change is the most profound social and environmental issue of the 21st century. This course will integrate the emerging science and law of climate change along with economic and inter-generational equity aspects of the problem. We will consider how existing federal laws such as the Clean Air Act and NEPA may be used to address climate change as well as how new more comprehensive laws may be fashioned. Different policy instruments will be considered including carbon taxes and emissions trading.

Professor(s)

Pat Parenteau

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5365.01/Climate Change:The Power of Taxes

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions requires long-term changes in behavior, and in a market economy, consumers, businesses and industry respond to prices. Increases in the cost of greenhouse gases can reduce emissions, and reductions in the price of green alternatives can increase their use. This seminar explores the ways in which tax systems and other market-based measures can send these negative and positive price signals in the United States and elsewhere.

Professor(s)

Janet Milne

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5122.01/Communications, Advocacy & Leadership

This course reviews the broad spectrum of strategies and institutions through which public policy are changed, from legislation and litigation, to science and education, to grass-roots organizing and public messaging—each with its own important role and path to success, as well as its real world practical and policy limitations. The larger lesson of the course is that there is no one single way to change public policy in a democracy, but rather there are a number of sites and agents of change; knowing what to use, how to use it, and when to use it are the keys to success.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5304.01/Comparative Environmental Law Research Seminar

A research and writing seminar that provides a framework and faculty supervision for students to engage in comparative environmental law research. While the seminar is designed primarily to support VLS students participating in the US-China joint student research projects and will focus generally on China, the seminar is sufficiently broad to accommodate students interested in researching the environmental law systems of other countries.

Professor(s)

Yanmei Lin

Semester

2020 Fall

CRI7262.01/Constitutional Criminal Procedure

This is a basic course on Constitutional Criminal Procedure analyzing topics presented under the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. These topics include the Constitutional law pertaining to: searches and seizures; probable cause to search and arrest; the warrant requirement and the exclusionary rule; custodial interrogations; confessions; the privilege against self-incrimination; the right to counsel prior to trial; pre-trial lineups and pre-trial identifications. This is a JD bar class. Prerequisite: Criminal Law.

Professor(s)

Philip N. Meyer

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7130.01/Contracts

This course examines the requisite elements of a valid contract, while analyzing the effects of contracts on third parties and the impact of outside forces on contracting parties. Class will be conducted virtually at the scheduled days and times.

Professor(s)

David B. Firestone

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7130.02/Contracts

This course examines the requisite elements of a valid contract, while analyzing the effects of contracts on third parties and the impact of outside forces on contracting parties. Class will be conducted virtually at the scheduled days and times.

Professor(s)

Joe Brennan

Semester

2020 Fall

BUS6235.01/Corporations & Other Business Assoc.

Provides a basic understanding of the different organizational forms for businesses, including corporations, limited liability companies and partnerships, general partnerships and sole proprietorships. The course also examines the law of agency, and surveys selected topics, such as basic accounting principles, business formation, financing, dissolution, and securities regulation. A JD bar course.

Professor(s)

Oliver R. Goodenough

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7140.01/Criminal Law

This course focuses on the foundation of our system of substantive criminal law, with emphasis upon mental state, responsibility, justification and excuse, inchoate crimes, and liability for the conduct of another. Class will be conducted virtually at the scheduled days and times. Professor Kevin Doyle.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

CRI7307.01/Criminal Practice & Procedure

Skills-based course focused on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, the 4th, 5th, 6th and 8th amendments to the U.S. Constitution and the corresponding sections of the Vermont and New Hampshire Constitutions. This course will give students the opportunity to develop insight into the theoretical underpinnings of constitutional criminal law and procedure while at the same time learning the practical application of theory to practice. A JD bar class. Prerequisite: Criminal Law

Professor(s)

Anna Saxman '85

Semester

2020 Fall

MSC7905.01/Dean's Fellow

This program allows a group of selected third-year students to teach Legal Writing I under the supervision of legal writing faculty. The program requires attendance to a weekly training seminar.

Professor(s)

Greg Johnson

Semester

2020 Fall

BUS6237.01/Debtor-Creditor Law & Bankruptcy

An exploration of consumer bankruptcy law under Chapters 7, 12, and 13 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and how the law impacts the rights of borrowers and lenders. The course covers the creation of consumer lender-borrower relationships, including promissory notes, security agreements, and mortgages; rights of borrowers under the Truth in Lending Act, RESPA, and other consumer protection laws; creditor remedies; and exemption statutes under state and federal law.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

PUB7522.01/Election Law

This seminar examines legislative and judicial regulation of the political process. It stresses two main themes: 1) the ways in which Congress and the state legislatures regulate campaigns, elections, and participants in the political process and 2) the ways in which courts can justifiably intervene in that process.

Professor(s)

Brian Porto

Semester

2020 Fall

BUS6245.01/Employment Law

Examines areas of federal and state labor law which regulate the employment relationship and which provide minimum protection outside of collective bargaining. Major topics considered include wrongful discharge, post-employment liability, employee privacy, genetic and drug testing, and employee welfare and retirement benefits (ERISA).

Professor(s)

Joan Vogel

Semester

2020 Fall

BUS6246.01/Employment Law Practice

This employment law practicum is a one credit hands-on course designed to teach students practical pre-trial skills in the employment law context. The course will cover: client interview, drafting of a civil complaint, written and deposition discovery practice, and mediation.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

CLI9427.01/Energy Clinic

 Provides an opportunity to obtain field based experience on a part-time basis. A JD skills class.

Professor(s)

Kevin B. Jones

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5226.01/Energy Law & Policy-Carbon Constrained World

This course examines the legal and policy framework governing energy systems in the US and relevant international contexts. It considers the various primary sources of energy such as coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear, hydro and renewables (solar and wind). The course reviews the dynamics of accessing, developing and delivering these sources to produce final and useable forms of energy such as electricity, transportation fuel, and heat.

Professor(s)

Tade Oyewunmi

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5904.01/ENV SPTC: Climate Justice Practicum

Classes offered under this designation explore special areas of interest, including newly developing areas of law, or specialties of visiting faculty and fellows. Students should consult registration information specific information on classes presented under this title. Please see individual class descriptions by term.

Professor(s)

Marianne Engelman Lado

Semester

2020 Fall

CLI9302.01/Environmental Advocacy Clinic

The EAC is a public interest environmental law firm. Student clinicians work on behalf of environmental and conservation organizations under the supervision of clinical faculty. In addition to work on cases, students attend weekly staff meetings and a weekly seminar. Clinic credits range from 6 to 13. Skills & AWR class.

Professor(s)

Jim Murphy

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5115.01/Environmental Law

An introduction to the broader categories of protecting human health and the environment to both assess the successes and failures of environmental protection in the U.S. and gain more detailed substantive knowledge of several key statutes.

Professor(s)

David B. Firestone

Semester

2020 Fall

FAM7710.01/Estates

This course examines gratuitous transfers by intestate succession, wills, trusts, and other techniques; execution and revocation of wills; will substitutes; administration of estates; family survivors' rights; the nature of trusts and fiduciary relationships; powers of appointment; and future interests. A JD bar class. Prerequisite: REQ7160-Property

Professor(s)

Stephanie Willbanks

Semester

2020 Fall

LIT7210.01/Evidence

Considers the rules governing the admissibility of testimonial, physical, documentary, and demonstrative evidence in trials and other formal legal proceedings. Topics considered include relevance, prejudice, competency, hearsay, opinion, impeachment, and privilege.

Professor(s)

Clara Gimenez

Semester

2020 Fall

LIT7211.01/Evidence Lab

A required component of Evidence during the Fall and Spring semesters, the lab requires students to apply the rules of Evidence in a courtroom simulation.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

FAM7715.01/Family Law

This course will examine the roles of law and of private ordering in family law contexts. Topics which may be included are marriage and divorce, child custody and support, alimony, property division, tax consequences of divorce, and family violence. The course will also look at various means of dispute resolution in the domestic relations area, including negotiation, mediation, and litigation. The course will include simulations and other exercises designed to develop practical skills and to consider substantive law through skill exercises.

Professor(s)

Margaret Olnek

Semester

2020 Fall

PUB7500.01/First Amendment Law

Covers the core issues of First Amendment law: free speech, free press, free exercise of religion, the establishment clause, and freedom of association.

Professor(s)

Peter Teachout

Semester

2020 Fall

CLI9428.01/Food & Agriculture Clinic

Provides an opportunity to obtain field based experience on a part-time basis. A JD skills class. Food & Agriculture Clinic

Professor(s)

Sophia Kruszewski

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7175.01/Foundations of Legal Analysis

Focuses on building and reinforcing the analytical, writing, and reasoning skills essential for success in law school.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

GPP7823.01/GPP: Bankruptcy Practice Lab

A simulation-based introduction to consumer bankruptcy. Students interview prospective bankruptcy client, prepare bankruptcy schedules, learn about the role of the bankruptcy trustee, determine the appropriate bankruptcy chapter for each client; discern whether any litigation may arise within the bankruptcy case; and argue motions on behalf of their clients. A hands-on introduction to Landlord/Tenant law is also offered. Students will complete several tasks, such as negotiating a lease agreement, and exchanging eviction pleadings.

Professor(s)

Donald Hayes

Semester

2020 Fall

GPP7817.01/GPP: Criminal Process -Bail to Jail

This simulation-based course provides exposure to the process and procedure of criminal trial court. Students act as prosecutors and defense attorneys in a criminal matter, from arraignment and bail hearing through plea bargain. Students draft motions, engage in plea negotiations, and perform bail, plea, and sentencing hearings.

Professor(s)

Elizabeth Kruska

Semester

2020 Fall

FAM7720.01/Health Law

This survey course focuses on the core of current health care litigation and regulation in the United States, namely the issues surrounding liability and quality, and health care organization and finance.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

WRI7900.01/Independent Research Project

Working under the supervision of working faculty sponsor, the IRP provides an individual student with an opportunity to research and write about an area of law in which the student has a particular interest. Students must follow the guidelines for Independent Research Projects contained in the Academic Regulations (see Student Handbook). An AWR class Students must follow the guidelines for Independent Research Projects contained in the Academic Regulations of Vermont Law School. The Academic Regulations are listed in the Student Handbook.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5218.01/International Climate Change Law

The International Climate Law course is a unique service-based learning course. Selected students study the international climate change negotiations and policy through both theory and first-hand observation.

Students must be enrolled in the juris doctor and/or masters programs. The method of evaluation is based on writing projects and class participation. Due to limited seats, students must apply for the class.

Professor(s)

Sarah M. Reiter JD’13

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5108.01/Intro to Ag & Food Law & Policy

Feeding a growing global population—9.6 billion by 2050—without destroying our planet is one of the critical challenges of our time. Overlay the impacts of climate change, international trade, and the influence of corporations on agricultural production, and this is one of the most complex areas of the law and policy. It is also one of the fastest growing areas, fueled by the food movement both domestically and internationally, greater public awareness of food issues and concerns related to the healthfulness of our food. Indeed, this is an exciting time to be studying food systems law.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

CLI9425.01/JD Part-Time Externship

Provides an opportunity to obtain field based experience on a part-time basis. Students must work three hours per week for 15 weeks for each credit earned, and may earn from four to six credits depending on the time committed. Students meet regularly with their faculty sponsors for evaluation and reflection of their experience.

Professor(s)

Beth Locker

Semester

2020 Fall

CLI9430.01/Judicial Externship

Places students in judges chambers, where students learn about the process of judicial decision making by observing the function of a court. Students work with the supervising judge to develop legal skills such as writing, research, and analytical skills. All judicial externship students complete an Academic Component which concentrates on judicial and legal ethics, judicial philosophy and history; decision making and judicial discretion; and judicial opinion writing.

Professor(s)

Beth Locker

Semester

2020 Fall

CLI9431.01/Judicial Externship Seminar

Professor(s)

Beth Locker

Semester

2020 Fall

WRI7975.01/July Early Bar

July Early Bar (“JEB”) Course is a six-credit course designed to prepare students to sit for the Vermont (UBE) July bar exam prior to graduating. No additional commercial bar preparation class will be needed. JEB covers the 12 subjects tested on the UBE and Kaplan’s full bar prep course and VLS professors provide additional instruction and practice.

M,T,W,Th

Professor(s)

Joe Brennan

Semester

2020 Fall

LLM9606.01/L.L.M. Seminar

Explores diverse advanced topics and viewpoints over environmental law and policy, through discussion and lectures from environmental scholars who will present their scholarship to the seminar.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5125.01/Land Use Regulation

This course reviews and evaluates the traditional American legal controls available to regulate the use of land, including local zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations, as well as more innovative techniques such as growth tempo controls, growth boundaries and transferable development rights. It examines the relevant statutory basis for these techniques and the constitutional limitations on their use. It evaluates their effectiveness in controlling sprawl and addressing climate change and explores the relative roles of state and local government in land use regulation.

Professor(s)

Janet Milne

Semester

2020 Fall

WRI7951.01/Law Review II

No Course Description is available for this course.

F 2:10 PM-3:25 PM; On-campus

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5113.01/Legal & Policy Writing Seminar

This course will introduce students to key principles of clear and precise writing, familiarize them with legal organization and IRAC (Issue, Rule, Analysis, Conclusion), and teach them the basics of legal research. These basic skills help students succeed in their other classes, as well as in their professional careers. For Masters Students Only.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7120.01/Legal Analysis and Writing I

Introduction to the building blocks of legal analysis and legal writing. Students are taught to read critically, and how to apply critical reading and thinking skills to common law and statutory analysis.Students also learn the fundamentals of legal writing - accuracy, brevity, and clarity - through a series of typical exercises typical of assessments given to new lawyers. Class will be conducted virtually at the scheduled days and times.

Professor(s)

Greg Johnson

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7120.02/Legal Analysis and Writing I

 Introduction to the building blocks of legal analysis and legal writing. Students are taught to read critically, and how to apply critical reading and thinking skills to common law and statutory analysis.Students also learn the fundamentals of legal writing - accuracy, brevity, and clarity - through a series of typical exercises typical of assessments given to new lawyers. Class will be conducted virtually at the scheduled days and times.

Professor(s)

Greg Johnson

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7122.01/Legal Research

 Introduction to legal research tools and strategies relevant for law school as well as legal practice. Topics include legal authority, the use of primary and secondary sources, effictive use of LexisNexis, Westlaw, and other electronic databases, the role of the Internet in legal research, and a brief introduction to environmental and international legal research. Emphasis is placed on appropriate and effective research strategies and evaluation of sources, both print and electronic.

Professor(s)

Cynthia Lewis

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7122.02/Legal Research

Introduction to legal research tools and strategies relevant for law school as well as legal practice. Topics include legal authority, the use of primary and secondary sources, effictive use of LexisNexis, Westlaw, and other electronic databases, the role of the Internet in legal research, and a brief introduction to environmental and international legal research. Emphasis is placed on appropriate and effective research strategies and evaluation of sources, both print and electronic.

Professor(s)

Cynthia Lewis

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7122.03/Legal Research

Introduction to legal research tools and strategies relevant for law school as well as legal practice. Topics include legal authority, the use of primary and secondary sources, effictive use of LexisNexis, Westlaw, and other electronic databases, the role of the Internet in legal research, and a brief introduction to environmental and international legal research. Emphasis is placed on appropriate and effective research strategies and evaluation of sources, both print and electronic.

Professor(s)

Jane Woldow

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7122.04/Legal Research

Introduction to legal research tools and strategies relevant for law school as well as legal practice. Topics include legal authority, the use of primary and secondary sources, effictive use of LexisNexis, Westlaw, and other electronic databases, the role of the Internet in legal research, and a brief introduction to environmental and international legal research. Emphasis is placed on appropriate and effective research strategies and evaluation of sources, both print and electronic.

Professor(s)

Jane Woldow

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7122.05/Legal Research

Introduction to legal research tools and strategies relevant for law school as well as legal practice. Topics include legal authority, the use of primary and secondary sources, effictive use of LexisNexis, Westlaw, and other electronic databases, the role of the Internet in legal research, and a brief introduction to environmental and international legal research. Emphasis is placed on appropriate and effective research strategies and evaluation of sources, both print and electronic.
 
 

Professor(s)

Christine Ryan

Semester

2020 Fall

PUB7510.01/Legislation

Examines legislative law and the legislative process. Topics include: the nature and history of legislative power, legislative structure and procedure, legislative advocacy, drafting statutory law, statutory construction, legislative history, legislative oversight, and the role of legislative attorneys in the process and the development of public policy.

Professor(s)

David Hall

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7186.01/Legislation and Regulation Survey

This course will provide students an introduction to the legislative process, regulatory agencies, and agency law-making. Students will learn to navigate modern U.S. government institutions and processes, with a particular emphasis on the legislative process and the administrative state. Key topics include the structure and animating principles of the U.S. Class will be conducted virtually at the scheduled days and times.

Professor(s)

Matthew Bernstein

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7185.01/Legislation/Regulation

Class will be conducted virtually at the scheduled days and times.

Professor(s)

Laurie Beyranevand '03

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7185.02/Legislation/Regulation

Class will be conducted virtually at the scheduled days and times.

Professor(s)

Jonathan Rosenbloom

Semester

2020 Fall

RSJ7215.01/Narrative Writing Seminar

No Course Description is available for this course.

MW 12:45 PM-2:00 PM; On-campus, Oakes Hall, Classroom 207

Professor(s)

Jared Carter

Semester

2020 Fall

PUB7550.01/National Security Law

Explores lawyers' involvement in the formulation and implementation of United States foreign and national defense policy through the examination variety of domestic, constitutional, and international law issues such as authority for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, intelligence gathering at home and abroad, detention and interrogation of terrorist suspects, planning for the next terrorist attack, protection of sensitive government information, and other current topics.

Professor(s)

Richard Sala JD/MELP'13

Semester

2020 Fall

ADR6420.01/Negotiation

A hands-on introduction to the theory and practice of negotiation. Explores the tension that is created in every negotiation between cooperating to create value with the other side and competing to claim value against the other side. While there is a lecture component of this course, instruction relies heavily on the use of simulations. Class will be conducted virtually at the scheduled days and times.

Professor(s)

Donald "Tad" Powers

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5346.01/New Frontiers in Environmental Policies

Explores the proposition that successfully coping with current environmental threats requires deeper challenges to our prevailing system of political economy than mainstream environmentalism in the United States has been willing to mount. The course develops the idea that a new American environmentalism is needed and with it new environmental policy and law that go beyond the traditional realm of environmental affairs. Perspectives class.

Professor(s)

Thomas McHenry

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5423.01/Ocean & Coastal Law

A review of domestic and international laws and treaties relating to coastal management, pollution, protected areas, endangered species, fish, marine mammals, wetlands, and seabed mineral and hydrocarbon resources. The course considers how effectively these legal authorities blend together to provide rational and comprehensive management and protection of marine resources.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

RSJ7120.01/Origins, Evolution & Critical Issuein Restorative Justice

This course covers the evolving definitions and history of restorative justice and related regulatory and relational practices and approaches. Faculty and students will consider the ways concepts and debates in restorative justice are evolving and being used to tackle some of society’s most challenging problems.

T, Th 11:20 AM-12:35 PM; On-campus, Oakes Hall, Classroom 211

Professor(s)

John Miller

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7265.01/Professional Responsibility

The study of a lawyer's professional obligations based on the ABA's Model Rules, ethical rules from selected jurisdictions, and other laws and traditions governing professional conduct. Students develop the knowledge and skills necessary to identify ethical dilemmas and acquire the tools to help resolve them.

MW 5:00 PM-6:15 PM; On-campus, Oakes Hall, Classroom 007

Professor(s)

Margaret Olnek

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ 7265.02/Professional Responsibility

The study of a lawyer's professional obligations based on the ABA's Model Rules, ethical rules from selected jurisdictions, and other laws and traditions governing professional conduct. Students develop the knowledge and skills necessary to identify ethical dilemmas and acquire the tools to help resolve them.

MW 11:20 AM-12:35 PM; On-campus, Oakes Hall, Classroom 208

Professor(s)

Pamela A. Vesilind

Semester

2020 Fall

DIV7610.01/Race & the Law Seminar

Provides an introduction to race as it relates to and is reflected in the law. The seminar focuses on the role and experience of African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Latin-Americans, and Native-Americans in American society, with attention to questions concerning critical race theory, class, family, and feminism. Perspective & AWR.

Professor(s)

Shirley Jefferson

Semester

2020 Fall

GPP7813.01/Real Estate Practice Lab

A simulation-based survey of real estate transactions. Students search, review, and analyze titles; counsel clients; negotiate real estate transactions; and draft of documents for real estate closings.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

BUS6290.01/Securities Regulation

A study of federal law and the rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission concerning the registration, distribution and trading of securities, and legal and regulatory aspects of the securities industry. The course considers the responsibilities and liabilities of issuers of securities, its officers and directors, brokers, attorneys, and other participants in the distribution and trading processes, as well as issues regarding "insider" trading.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

CLI9411.01/Semester In Practice (SIP)

Places students under the supervision of an experienced lawyer in a government office, NGO, non-profit organization, corporation, or law firm. Students engage in self-directed learning under the guidance of the supervising attorney and learn about the practice of law through observation and participation in practice.

Professor(s)

Beth Locker

Semester

2020 Fall

CLI9310.01/South Royalton Legal Clinic FT

The South Royalton Legal Clinic is dedicated to serving Vermont residents who cannot afford private counsel. Students work under supervising attorneys representing real clients in civil cases in state and federal courts in Vermont and before administrative agencies. Skills & AWR class.

Professor(s)

Erin Jacobsen

Semester

2020 Fall

WRI7902/Special Topics

No Course Description is available for this course.

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

WRI7902.01/Special Topics: Afta Nafta USMCA and Sustainability

This seminar provides students the opportunity for in-depth research and analysis in a developing area of multi-national law. After a political and legislative process that began in 2017, the expiring North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), in effect since 1994, has been replaced by the United States Mexico Canada Agreement (USMCA) finally adopted by the three party states in 2020. The new Agreement is scheduled to take effect on July 1, 2020, if all parties can complete detailed implementation measures in the shadow of COVID 19.

Professor(s)

L. Kinvin Wroth

Semester

2020 Fall

PUB7580.01/State & Local Government

The majority of law and policy professionals will operate primarily in arenas controlled by state and local law. This is especially true in a period marked by federal paralysis, where state and local governments are taking the initiative in environmental, social and economic arenas. This course examines the range of state and local government authority, as well the constitutional, statutory and practical limitations on its exercise. The course introduces students to the key elements of public finance, including innovative financing methods for state and local governmental initiatives.

Professor(s)

Jonathan Rosenbloom

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7150.02/Torts

This course presents the study of the legal protection afforded against interference by others with the security of one's person, property, or intangible interests. Class will be conducted virtually at the scheduled days and times.

Professor(s)

Stephanie Willbanks

Semester

2020 Fall

REQ7150.01/Torts

This course presents the study of the legal protection afforded against interference by others with the security of one's person, property, or intangible interests. Class will be conducted virtually at the scheduled days and times.

Professor(s)

Mark Latham

Semester

2020 Fall

INT7428.01/Trade Law and Policy

An introduction to trade law and policy, with particular focus on how U.S. trade policy affects, among other things, jobs for American workers, global prosperity and income distribution, access to needed medicines, and indigenous cultures. We will examine how current WTO rules either advance or sabotage progress toward establishment of a more prosperous and egalitarian world economic order and consider proposed reforms of the investor protection provisions in NAFTA and other regional free trade agreements.

Professor(s)

Peter Teachout

Semester

2020 Fall

LIT7220.01/Trial Practice

This skills course covers the important aspects of a trial, including jury selection, opening statements, direct and cross examination, exhibits, objections, expert witnesses, and closing arguments. The course culminates in a full, simulated trial.

Professor(s)

Jordana Levine

Semester

2020 Fall

WRI7960.01/Vermont Journal of Environmental Law I

AWR

F 2:10 PM-3:25 PM; On-campus

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Fall

ENV5245.01/Water Resources Law

Water is the planet's most precious natural resource. Deciding how it will be shared among competing demands is one of a society's most challenging questions. Water Resources Law is a review of the law and policies concerned with the allocation of water resources in the United States.

Professor(s)

John Echeverria

Semester

2020 Fall